Blog Archives

Foam Rolling for Ballet Dancers

foamrollingballet

If you are one of those dancers who has tight iliotibial bands or “IT bands” you know that it is not an easy task loosening them up. Today I want to share with you a different way to loosen up your IT band. These exercises work well because they do not put direct pressure on the IT band, rather on the muscle groups surrounding it which are the real culprits for the tightness!

But first lets explore the IT band by locating it. The Iliotibial Band is a thick strip of connective tissue that connects several muscles in the outside thigh. It plays a key role in the movement of the thigh by connecting hip muscles to the tibia of the lower leg. (see below) Tight IT bands in dancers is very common and can cause hip and knee pain as well as injuries. It can also inhibit flexibility which of course affects extension and developé.

ITB

Anytime my Ballet Strength clients start to feel hip or knee pain and/or tightness, I add the exercises in the video below to their training program. Give them a try yourself, performing 10 repetitions in each position to increase your flexibility.

 

 

This article was originally published on www.balletstrength.com

*References innerbody.com, athletico.com

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Improve Your Extensions for Ballet

develope
So you want to improve your extension – your developes front, side and back – who doesnt!? In this blog I am going to go over the exercises that you should be doing to help your develope height tremendously.

Extension and flexibility are two words that are pretty much synonymous in the ballet world but each has it’s own place in your ballet technique. The two compliment each other, however flexibility is not the sole reason that you cannot get your leg up…and hold it there. Strength (yes, there’s that word again) is usually the limiting factor.

As dancers our hips take a real beating. From doing daily ballerina things like standing turned out, gripping in the thighs and quite frankly, not knowing how to properly engage our core muscles, we are already at a disadvantage. Gripping in the hips is the #1 reason why I see dancers struggle with their extension (also in turns and jumps too). So how can you undo years of damage and unlock your potential to a freely moving hip?

#1 Breathe – Sounds simple, right? Wrong. Chances are, you don’t even realize that you are holding your breath. When we tense our muscles we are usually holding our breath at the same time creating even more tension to the muscles. Instead, try visualizing your hip as a sponge. Take your leg up to passe (think of a sponge full of water). Right before you develope the leg think of the hip relaxing and breathe. Then as you extend the leg, think of the sponge “wringing out” as you develope. Practice this and eventually you will be able to visualize this way in class.

#2 Strengthen & Release – Strengthening various muscles such as the glutes, inner thighs, and core can help release a lot of unnecessary tension from the hips, resulting in better extensions. Try the following exercises taken right from my YouTube Channel:

#3 Rebuild – Rather than showing you a bunch of ballet stretches and exercises that you already know and have tried (like the hike your hip up and hold exercise) I am going to give you an exercise that you can do to strengthen the gluteus medius muscle. First I will show you where the glute medius is located followed two exercises. “Monster Walks” and “Hip Abduction” which can help retrain the muscles around the hip pain and tightness that you feel from gripping.

hipPainDiag

Monster Walks – Perform 3 sets of 15 repetitions each leg with a resistance band.

monsterwalk

Hip Abduction – Perform 3 sets of 15-20 repetitions being sure to keep the leg parallel.

hipabduction

I am looking forward to hearing how your extension improves just from these 3 quick tips. As always, please feel free to contact me with your questions and don’t forget to check out my great products that you can find exclusively at www.balletstrength.com.

 

Committed to Your Dancing,

Nikol Klein

 

 

Ballet Strength Stretching Secrets

These stretches are best done after class.

If you are like the majority of dancers, your daily routine begins by showing up 30 minutes or so before ballet class starts to warm-up. The keyword here is “warm-up.” What most of you end up doing is stretching as a warm-up which may be causing more harm than good. Read on to find out the proven reasons why you should not be stretching before class.

If you are stretching in an effort to increase or enhance performance prior to ballet class or the big show, you are really doing yourself a great disservice. Static stretching results in a decrease in performance while dynamic stretching results in an increase in performance (*see reference 1 below).

Some of us don’t really know why we stretch before class…we just do it because we saw someone else doing it. I don’t know about you, but I never had a ballet instructor suggest stretching before class. They did however suggest warming-up. There is a big difference.

Your pre ballet class ritual should consist of a dynamic warm-up done in an effort to specifically turn-on and activate muscles through heightened neurological communication between the brain and muscle motor units. Stretching will not achieve this. Stretching should be done in an effort to recover and restore fatigued muscles after ballet class or performance. The goal of post class/ performance stretching would be to restore range of motion and/or to release tight muscle fibers to provide efficient blood flow which brings essential nutrients into the muscle to repair, restore, and recover.

A great dynamic warm-up for example would consist of high knee lifts (think marching in place), torso twists, arm circles, and believe it or not a jog around the ballet classroom to elevate the heart-rate and get the blood moving. How many of you have seen girls jogging around the room in auditions to warm-up and laughed at them for doing so? (now the joke is on you!)

If you are looking to maximize those splits or extension, work on your deep stretching after class from now on. Also, be sure to give a dynamic warm-up a try before class this week and notice the difference in the way your muscles feel during class. I’m looking forward to hearing your throughts and experiences with this!

Committed to Your Dancing,

Nikol Klein
www.balletstrength.com
www.balletaudition.com

*Resources:[1]  L. Parsons, N. Maxwell, C.Elniff, M. Jacka, and N. Heerschee Static vs. Dynamic Stretching on Vertical Jump and Standing Long Jump (2006), Greg Romero Coaching (2011)